Throwback Thursday- Mike & Dave Need Wedding Dates (The House)

Yes, I'm ignoring Despicable Me 3. I know people love those yellow guys and all, but...I just couldn't this week. I'm sorry if I let you down.

 Please stop staring at Gajje (youtube.com)

Please stop staring at Gajje (youtube.com)

The House looks like a particular type of comedy that I want to like, that I want to be excited for, perhaps even that I once would have been excited for, but I just don’t find myself in that state. Part of it is, I’m sure, the two most recent comedy efforts of from Poehler—Sisters—and Ferrell—Daddy’s Home—have been disappointing, but that’s only part of it.

The other piece is I’m finding myself less and less up for the stories of staid adults who decide to engage in reckless acts, go too far, encounter a moment of epiphany, and they then reform while still maintaining some lessons that their time of recklessness uncover. You see it in Old School, Bad Moms, Keanu, the above noted Sisters…even more “serious” movies like American Beauty mine a very similar structure. It has been used in several movies I’ve liked or loved. But now…it’s all just so…depressing. As someone who is pushing deeper and deeper into chronological adulthood, the idea of being adult as a sort of spirit deadening prison is something I find less and less “fun.” If it is, I don’t want to be reminded of it and if it isn’t I don’t that trope forever being rehashed. It’s like the “married people never have sex,” trope for life at large.

I am curious is The House is truly great if I forgot my current mindset for those around 2 hours.

 Either movies are misleading people about the ubiquity of apple bongs or I just don't know the right people. (youtube.com)

Either movies are misleading people about the ubiquity of apple bongs or I just don't know the right people. (youtube.com)

MIKE AND DAVE NEED WEDDING DATES

Mike and Dave Need Wedding Dates is not one of those kinds of movies. It is one of those Apatow-style “good but immature guys need to grow up now” films instead. The “twist” as it is here is that actually their woman counterparts—here played by Anna Kendrick and Aubrey Plaza—are the far less mature, far more dangerous and self-destructive people. Mike and Dave are immature but ultimately more good-heartened and oblivious. On the women, on the other hand, are reckless, selfish, and seemingly actively resistant to making their antic about anyone but themselves.

M&DNWD—as it is known to fans—is a slight, mildly diverting affair. There is nothing that really makes you sit up and take notice and no comedy set pieces that are likely to stick with you moments after the credits end. It’s probably better than you might expect but that’s not really the same as being good.